Why People Love Childish Songs And Simple Movies So Much (M)

The study helps explain why comparatively light-hearted and childish entertainments can be so meaningful to people.

The study helps explain why comparatively light-hearted and childish entertainments can be so meaningful to people.


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High IQ Is Linked To Loving This Surprising Type Of Music

People use this music to ‘purge’ their negativity.

People use this music to ‘purge’ their negativity.

Liking heavy metal music is a sign of high intelligence, research suggests.

Some people may use heavy metal music as a way of coping with being talented.

Being a ‘metalhead’ is sometimes associated with poor performance and delinquency, but this survey found otherwise.

More intelligent people may find themselves outsiders and use heavy metal music to deal with the stress.

Dr Stuart Cadwallader, the study’s author, says there is a stereotype that more intelligent people are into classical music.

While this is true for some, others take solace in heavy metal.

Dr Cadwallader said that young people enjoy the complex and sometimes political themes in metal that are not explored in mainstream pop music.

Both alienation and being separate from society may chime with some gifted people.

The results come from a survey of 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth in the UK.

This body represents young people aged 11-18 who are in the top 5 per cent academically.

The results showed that while rock was the most popular genre among talented youngsters, one-third rated heavy metal in their top five genres and 6 per cent gave it top spot.

Those who particularly liked heavy metal also tended to have lower self-esteem.

Genres traditionally linked to intelligence — classical music and jazz — were the least popular.

Some young people said they liked to literally ‘jump out’ their frustrations and anger to heavy metal.

Dr Cadwallader said:

“Perhaps the pressures associated with being gifted and talented can be temporarily forgotten with the aid of music.

As one student suggests, perhaps gifted people may experience more pressure than their peers and they use the music to purge this negativity.”

The study was published by the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth (Cadwaller, 2007).

The Type Of Music That Boosts Brain Function (M)

This type of music probably stimulates the prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain critical for executive functions.

This type of music probably stimulates the prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain critical for executive functions.


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The Creative Therapy That Helps Reduce Depression

Higher self-esteem from a common creative therapy that also helps reduce depression.

Higher self-esteem from a common creative therapy that also helps reduce depression.

Music therapy can reduce depression in young people with behaviour problems, research finds.

Music therapy also increased self-esteem compared to those who received the usual treatment without the therapy.

The conclusions come from the largest every study of its kind.

It involved 251 children, only half of whom were given music therapy.

The music therapy itself included things like the therapist asking children to describe how they felt by playing a tune.

All the children in the study were being treated for behavioural, emotional or developmental problems.

The results showed that those who received the music therapy had higher self-esteem and reduced depression in comparison to those that had care as usual.

Professor Sam Porter, who led the study, said:

“This study is hugely significant in terms of determining effective treatments for children and young people with behavioural problems and mental health needs.

The findings contained in our report should be considered by healthcare providers and commissioners when making decisions about the sort of care for young people that they wish to support.”

Ciara Reilly, Chief Executive of Every Day Harmony, a music therapy charity, said:

“Music therapy has often been used with children and young people with particular mental health needs, but this is the first time its effectiveness has been shown by a definitive randomised controlled trail in a clinical setting.

The findings are dramatic and underscore the need for music therapy to be made available as a mainstream treatment option.

For a long time we have relied on anecdotal evidence and small-scale research findings about how well music therapy works.

Now we have robust clinical evidence to show its beneficial effects.”

The study was published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, (Porter et al., 2016).

The Musical Sign Of High IQ

This is a sign of higher nonverbal IQ.

This is a sign of higher nonverbal IQ.

People with musical talent have a higher IQ, research finds.

Being good at recognising a tune and having rhythm is linked to higher nonverbal intelligence, psychologists have discovered.

It doesn’t matter whether or not people have had musical training — musical aptitude is still linked to higher IQ.

People with an aptitude for music are more likely to study it and improve their skills even further, which further enhances their IQ

The conclusions come from a study of 133 people, around half of whom had had musical training.

Many studies have already linked musical skill to higher IQ, the authors write:

“Musically trained children and adults score higher on intelligence tests than their untrained counterparts.

Moreover, as duration of training increases,
so does intelligence.”

However, this study wanted to see what comes first.

All were given tests of both melody and rhythm.

The melody test involved listening to short tunes and judging whether they were the same or different.

The rhythm test was something similar, except with beats rather than notes.

The results showed that people with more musical ability had higher intelligence, even when musical training was taken into account.

So,the link between being musical and a higher IQ is down to both an aptitude for music and training.

At its root, the link between music and IQ is partly genetic, the authors write:

“…both music aptitude and intelligence have significant genetic components that overlap to an extent.

The specific genotypic structures of general intelligence and music aptitude are not well understood, but it is clear that intelligence is substantially heritable, and that the impact of genetic factors increases from childhood (heritability ≈50%) to adulthood (≈80%)”

The study was published in the journal Intelligence (Swaminathan et al., 2017).

The Motivational Music That Fights Mental Barrier To Exercise (M)

After listening to a self-selected motivational playlist, runners who were mentally tired displayed the same performance as those who were mentally fresh.

After listening to a self-selected motivational playlist, runners who were mentally tired displayed the same performance as those who were mentally fresh.


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