The Shocking Effect Of ‘Hidden’ Sibling Bullying On Adult Depression (M)

Around half of children were bullied by a sibling, sometimes with serious consequences, a study finds.

Around half of children were bullied by a sibling, sometimes with serious consequences, a study finds.

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Young Women Have Highest Depression And Self-Harm Risk

Only 3% are receiving psychological therapy, the survey of 17,000 found.

Only 3% are receiving psychological therapy, the survey of 17,000 found.

Young women are at the greatest risk of common mental health problems, new research finds.

One in four young women have self-harmed, usually by cutting themselves, according to the UK survey, compared with 10% of young men.

One-fifth of young women had experienced common mental disorders problems.

Women of all ages were much more likely to report severe mental health problems than men.

Around one in eight men reported a common mental health disorder.

A comparison with previous surveys suggests that young women’s mental health is getting worse, while young men’s may be improving.

10% taking medication

Overall, the survey found that one in six adults in England met the criteria for a common mental disorder, like anxiety and depression.

The most common form of treatment people used was medication, taken by 10% of those interviewed.

Just 3% received psychological therapy.

Only one-third of people, though, received any treatment at all for their condition — although treatment levels have increased from one-quarter almost a decade ago.

Stephen Buckley, head of information at the Mind charity, said:

‘Young people are coming of working age in times of economic uncertainty, they’re more likely to experience issues associated with debt, unemployment and poverty, and they are up against increasing social and environmental pressures, all of which affect well-being.’

Mr Buckley blamed the rise on social media:

“Since the last data was released in 2009, we’ve seen a surge in the use of social media.

While social media can promote good mental health and can help people feel less isolated, it also comes with some risks.

Its instantaneous and anonymous nature means it’s easy for people to make hasty and sometimes ill-advised comments that can negatively affect other people’s mental health.

It’s important to avoid sites that are likely to trigger negative feelings and/or behaviour and to take a break from social media if you’re feeling vulnerable.”

The study was carried out by NHS Digital (NHS, 2016).

Antidepressant Thought Safe Linked To Self-Harm And Suicide

Drug thought safe for teenagers linked to suicidal and self-harming behaviours.

Drug thought safe for teenagers linked to suicidal and self-harming behaviours.

A common antidepressant thought safe for adolescents is actually ineffective, new research finds.

Worse, it has been linked to serious side-effects.

The drug is called paroxetine, which is marketed as Paxil, Seroxat and Aropax.

The conclusions come from a re-evaluation of a study — known as ‘Study 329’ — carried out in 2001 .

Study 329, which was funded by the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, originally claimed paroxetine was effective and safe.

Not only were these conclusions wrong, the new analysis argues, but the drug has worrying side-effects.

Professor Jon Jureidini, who led the research, said:

“Although concerns had already been raised about Study 329, and the way it was reported, the data was not previously made available so researchers and clinicians weren’t able to identify all of the errors in the published report.

It wasn’t until the data was made available for re-examination that it became apparent that paroxetine was linked to serious adverse reactions, with 11 of the patients taking paroxetine engaging in suicidal or self-harming behaviours compared to only one person in the group of patients who took the placebo.

Our study also revealed that paroxetine was no more effective at relieving the symptoms of depression than a placebo.

This is highly concerning because prescribing this drug may have put young patients at unnecessary risk from a treatment that was supposed to help them.”

Professor Jureidini thinks pharmaceutical companies should make their data available for reanalysis.

He said:

“Our reanalysis of Study 329 came to very different conclusions to those in the original paper.

We also learnt a lot about incorrect reporting and the considerable fall out that can be associated with distorted data.

Regulatory research authorities should mandate that all data and protocols are accessible.

Although concerns about patient confidentiality and ‘commercial in confidence’ issues are important, the reanalysis of Study 329 illustrates the necessity of making primary trial data available to increase the rigour of evidence-based research.”

The research was published in the British Medical Journal (Noury et al., 2015).

Image credit: JLA

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