About PsyBlog

This award-winning website is about scientific research into how the mind works. The studies I cover have been published in reputable academic journals in many different areas of psychology.

To give you a flavour there is a series on the top 10 social psychology studies, the 7 sins of memory and the psychology of money. There are more links to articles arranged by psychological themes. Individual popular articles are listed in the right-hand column.

Find out how to follow PsyBlog right here.

PsyBlog’s author

Jeremy Dean

Psychologist Dr. Jeremy Dean is the founder and author of the popular website ‘PsyBlog’.

The site analyses–with wit, clarity, and erudition–psychological studies that are relevant to everyday life. Topics have included how memory works, self-control, methods for boosting creativity and the psychology of work.

Dean launched PsyBlog in 2004, when he noticed a dearth of smart, readable news for those who like psychological insights backed up by science. Read the world over, the site has been featured in the following media outlets: BBC News, The New York Times (‘Health Around the Web’), The Los Angeles Times, Wired, NPR, The Guardian, and The London Times.

Dean’s first degree was in law but after a career in the Internet industry he began studying psychology. He has now racked up three higher degrees in psychology, his latest being a doctorate from University College London.

His current book is called ‘Making Habits, Breaking Habits: Why We Do Things, Why We Don’t, and How to Make Any Change Stick‘.

Partners

Although PsyBlog is solely authored by me, there are some partners I’d like to mention:

1. WordPress and the Thesis Theme

This blog runs on a wonderful Open Source, free-to-use blogging platform called WordPress. Should you be in the market for such a thing, I thoroughly recommend it. I have customised the website by using the Thesis Theme, which as they say themselves, “Makes your website load faster, rank higher and looker better“.

2. Flickr users

Every article I publish is accompanied by one or more images from Flickr users who have chosen to share their work with the world. Whatever the topic, I can always find someone on Flickr who has taken a compelling image that helps draw in the reader.

If I have used your image, then thank you very much. It’s much appreciated by both myself and my readers.

3. Readers and supporters

Over the years I’ve received some great compliments from readers (some even deserved!). Without you there’s no point to this, so it’s always fantastic to know the work is appreciated.

Here’s just a small selection of the nice things people have had to say:

“I just wanted to thank you for compiling such a terrific set of posts on the science of psychology. I teach an introduction to experimental psychology course, and I have been contemplating teaching the course using online resources (essays, blog posts, etc) in place of a textbook. Your site is a wonderful resource for students, and is one of the few collections of essays and posts on scientific psychology. Thank you for making this terrific resource available.” ~ Professor Daniel J. Simons

“Hello!
I recently stumbled upon your blog, and must tell you how interesting you, and your articles are…I find your information more fascinating with the backup of research. Please keep it coming! lol…” ~stacy

“hi Jeremy, your site has been invaluable to me and i wish i’d stumbled on it months ago.” ~old dog,new tricks

I am a master student of Psychology in Utrecht, The Netherlands. I really like your blog, it actually made me start my own :)) And I just did!” ~Dragos Petrescu

I have really enjoyed your blog since discovering it a couple of months ago. Your posts are always interesting, and I find myself following your links for more and back-linking my mini-blog with increasing frequency. Thanks for tickling the little grey cells.” ~Lorre Zuppan

I’m a Psych prof and am pleased to see someone out there trying to tell the world about the scientific side of psychology. There is too little appreciation for experimentation and too much reliance on correlations.” ~Mike

I’m a lawyer from India and was generally looking for something on “guilt” when I chanced upon your blog. It seems very interesting and informative and I’m sure I’ll be a regular from now on.” ~cherry

I’m a graduate student in Neuroscience at Iowa looking at motivation and emotion in depression. Very interesting blog.” ~scaramouche

Hi! I’m a student from malaysia and i stumbled upon your blog by accident. however, i am pleasantly surprised to find a very informative and entertaining blog.. great job, and keep it up!:)” ~nurul

I ran across (and linked to) your psychobabble article when writing a similar blog called “Therapists and their Pet Phrases” today. Very funny and helpful stuff you have here, thanks for being a (fellow) voice of reason in a confusing field.” ~Ryan Howes, Ph.D.

thank you the superb posts here.. this is the best informative i’ve came across..more power.” ~Gail

“I just developed an interest in Psychology and I am really glad to chance upon your website. Psyblog has given me much insight into psychology and stirred my interest in this subject even more! Thank you so much! Keep up the Awesome work!” ~Richard

“Your psychological choice of topics and clear and crisp writing style challenges us to connect, dissect, and simply enjoy the academic and folk themes of your blog…” ~Kenny E. Williams

Thanks to everyone for your comments and I hope you continue to enjoy learning about the science of psychology!

– Jeremy Dean

Text: © All rights reserved.

Images: Creative Commons License