How Memory Works: 8 Brilliant Psychology Studies

Memory can be improved by the right amount of stress, reading, one’s location and even something as simple as saying a word out loud (or not).

Memory can be improved by the right amount of stress, reading, one’s location and even something as simple as saying a word out loud (or not).

In the search for a better memory, scientists have tried all kinds of techniques.

Some of the latest include using laser light to stimulate the prefrontal cortex and optogenetics to control neurons to bring ‘forgotten’ memories back.

In less high-tech realms, the right amount of stress, reading, one’s location and even something as simple as saying a word out loud (or not) have been found to enhance memory.

Still, being forgetful is actually surprisingly common, even among young people, so it is not necessarily a sign of senility.

These ideas and more are explored in these 8 psychology studies on memory from the members-only section of PsyBlog.

(If you are not already, find out how to become a PsyBlog member here.)

  1. ‘Forgotten’ Memories Can Be Reawakened By Light
  2. Unlocking The Secret To Memorizing New Words
  3. These Are The Physical Signs Of A Razor-Sharp Memory
  4. Forgetfulness Is Common Even Among Young — Sometimes With Tragic Consequences
  5. Painless Laser Therapy Improves Memory By 25% In Minutes
  6. How Reading Changes Your Brain
  7. The Amount Of Stress That Improves Your Memory
  8. Why We Remember More When In New Places

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Hello, and welcome to PsyBlog. Thanks for dropping by.

This site is all about scientific research into how the mind works.

It’s mostly written by psychologist and author, Dr Jeremy Dean.

I try to dig up fascinating studies that tell us something about what it means to be human.

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Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book "Making Habits, Breaking Habits" (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks.