This High-Fat Diet Protects Against Dementia, Research Suggests

Foods included in the diet include seafood, low-carb vegetables, cheese, eggs, coconut oil and olive oil.

Foods included in the diet include seafood, low-carb vegetables, cheese, eggs, coconut oil and olive oil.

The ketogenic diet may help to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, research suggests.

The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet.

Foods included in the ketogenic diet include seafood, low-carb vegetables, cheese, eggs, coconut oil and olive oil.

The new study on mice showed that the ketogenic diet improved neurovascular function.

Dr Ai-Ling Lin, study co-author, explained:

“Neurovascular integrity, including cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier function, plays a major role in cognitive ability.

Recent science has suggested that neurovascular integrity might be regulated by the bacteria in the gut, so we set out to see whether the Ketogenic Diet enhanced brain vascular function and reduced neurodegeneration risk in young healthy mice.”

The diet has previously been linked to improvements in epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and autism.

Dr Lin said:

“While diet modifications, the Ketogenic Diet in particular, has demonstrated effectiveness in treating certain diseases, we chose to test healthy young mice using diet as a potential preventative measure.

We were delighted to see that we might indeed be able to use diet to mitigate risk for Alzheimer’s disease.”

The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience (Lee et al., 2018).


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It’s mostly written by psychologist and author, Dr Jeremy Dean.

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Author: Jeremy Dean

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology. He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book "Making Habits, Breaking Habits" (Da Capo, 2013) and several ebooks.