≡ Menu

The Nomophobia Test: Fear of Being Without Your Mobile Phone

The Nomophobia Test: Fear of Being Without Your Mobile Phone post image

Take the test for ‘nomophobia’: short for “no-mobile-phone phobia”.

Psychologists have developed a test for nomophobia: the fear of being without your phone.

Nomophobia is short for “no-mobile-phone phobia”.

The researchers found four aspects to nomophobia:

  1. not being able to communicate,
  2. losing connectedness,
  3. not being able to access information,
  4. and giving up convenience.

People in the study responded to the statements below on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree).

You can add up your total score, by adding your responses to each item.

The higher the score, the more you ‘suffer’ from nomophobia.

Here are the statements:

  1. I would feel uncomfortable without constant access to information through my smartphone.
  2. I would be annoyed if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.
  3. Being unable to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone would make me nervous.
  4. I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.
  5. Running out of battery in my smartphone would scare me.
  6. If I were to run out of credits or hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.
  7. If I did not have a data signal or could not connect to Wi-Fi, then I would constantly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.
  8. If I could not use my smartphone, I would be afraid of getting stranded somewhere.
  9. If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it.

If I did not have my smartphone with me:

  1. I would feel anxious because I could not instantly communicate with my family and/or friends.
  2. I would be worried because my family and/or friends could not reach me.
  3. I would feel nervous because I would not be able to receive text messages and calls.
  4. I would be anxious because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.
  5. I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.
  6. I would feel anxious because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.
  7. I would be nervous because I would be disconnected from my online identity.
  8. I would be uncomfortable because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.
  9. I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.
  10. I would feel anxious because I could not check my email messages.
  11. I would feel weird because I would not know what to do.

The study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior (Yildrim et al., 2015).

About the author

Psychologist, Jeremy Dean, PhD is the founder and author of PsyBlog. He holds a doctorate in psychology from University College London and two other advanced degrees in psychology.

He has been writing about scientific research on PsyBlog since 2004. He is also the author of the book “Making Habits, Breaking Habits” (Da Capo, 2003) and several ebooks:

Dr Dean’s bio, Twitter, Facebook and how to contact him.

Phone anxiety image from Shutterstock